Saturday, 8 May 2010

LOGIE STEADING

Originally built as a model farm in the 1920s, Logie Steading is now converted into a visitor centre to welcome visitors to the beautiful Findhorn Valley. there is a cafe, a great book shop with second hand and new books of all kinds, a craft shop and a farm shop selling local produce including Logie's own Longhorn beef and Jacob lamb. There is also a gallery selling paintings and many other crafts.
The cafe has some of the best cake I've tasted, well worth a visit for that alone.
Click on pictures to enlarge them.
I love the clock tower above the entrance to the steading, even though the time on the clock is wrong
A view of the steading from across the field
This is Logie House. The gardens of the house are usually open to the public but sadly this year, because of damaged caused by the severe winter weather, the garden is undergoing extensive repairs and won't be open until next spring.
Here is Greg sitting in a bower made of living willow. The smile on his face is in anticipation of chocolate cake.

How's this for a pair of handlebars? This old breed of cattle is very hardy, easy to handle, long lived and best of all the beef is delicious. Sirloin steak for dinner tomorrow. Yum Yum

this one is quite young with shorter horns, they look a bit sharp to me though.

Logie stands above the beautiful Findhorn River and the walks along the riverside are wonderful.
I love it at this time of year with the new spring growth.


This is a "dead" stump of an oak tree, but as you can see, it's anything but dead. In fact, it's supporting moss, fern and a scotch pine.

In this shot you can see a stack of trees and branches at the edge which have been swept along by the force of the water after heavy rain and snow melt.


The water in this pool looks like black coffee.

Beech leaves freshly painted and polished by nature.

Can anyone tell me what these little yellow flowers are? I think they may be a type of Euphorbia but I'm not sure.
They are very small.


9 comments:

jabblog said...

Beautiful shots! It looks a lovely place to visit and wander round - and the beef sounds good too - yum :-)

Lindy MacDuff said...

Such a beautiful place! It's a shame the gardens of Logie House were closed. Hopefully next winter won't be quite as severe.

The cattle look well cared for and healthy. Don't think I'd want to tangle with any of those horns!

The yellow flowers are pretty and so delicate looking, but someone else will need to identify them as I do not know.

Hope you both enjoyed your cake! =D This was a great tour, as always.

Happyone :-) said...

Crafts, books, chocolate cake, and a walk, sounds great to me!! :-)
Lovely photos!

Karen said...

Fabulous photographs, dear Chris. What a treat it is to visit your blog!

Betsy from Tennessee said...

Hi Chris, I don't know what those little yellow flowers are, but they are gorgeous...

That whole place must have really been a 'show-place' back in the day.. What a fancy 'barn' ---and house. Sorry about the gardens --but I'll bet they are fabulous next spring.

I'd love a piece of that cake myself.... Actually, I'd love to visit the entire farm.... I SO enjoy your blog posts since you take us to so many interesting places. Thanks so much!

Hugs,
Betsy

Linda said...

Are the flowers a sort of spurge? My wildflower books are all in Rothes, which doesn't help.

The dog we had when I was small was called Logie - after the Logie estate. He was a sweet Cocker Spaniel. I have a photo of him somewhere (probably Rothes!). Must have a go at scanning it in.

George said...

Thank you for taking us with you to Logie. The steading is a wonderful building, and the house is absolutely majestic. All in all it's a beautiful place. Now if you could only share some of that chocolate cake and beef with us!

Mogs said...

Cracking pics Chris as usual! Hope you are all well! Enjoying the cake!

Andrea said...

They are beautiful breeds of cattle. Those rivers i want to explore and look for anything living, moving or anchored permanently. These settings are very enticing for children too. I am sure there are also birds and mammals there!